Endless Summer Salad

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As improbable as it might sound, this combination is magnificent, both savory and refreshing at the same time. You can pare it down to the essential contrast, and serve no more than a plate of chunked watermelon, sprinkled with feta and mint and spritzed with lime, but this full-length version is hardly troublesome to make and once made will, Nigella (Lawson) assures, become a regular feature of your summer table. Hence, an endless summer salad!

A personal note: The mixture of flavors and the cool juiciness of the melon are wonderfully delectable, especially on those days that simmer. And the color? Gorgeous, no?

recipe-56

Watermelon, Feta And Black Olive Salad

 

INGREDIENTS

* 1 small red onion
* 2 – 4 Limes depending on juiciness
* 3½ pounds sweet, ripe watermelon
* 9 ounces feta cheese
* fresh Flat-leaf parsley
* fresh Mint chopped
* 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
* 4 ounces (½ cup) pitted black olives
* Black pepper

 

METHOD

 

1. Peel and halve the red onion and cut into very fine half-moons and put in a small bowl to steep with the lime juice, to bring out the transparent pinkness in the onions and diminish their rasp.
2. Two limes’ worth should do it, but you can find the fruits disappointingly dried up and barren when you cut them in half, in which case add more.
3. Remove the rind and pips from the watermelon, and cut into approximately 4cm triangular chunks.
4. Cut the feta into similar sized pieces and put them both into a large, wide shallow bowl.
5. Tear off sprigs of parsley so that it is used like a salad leaf, rather than a garnish, and add to the bowl along with the chopped mint.
6. Tip the now glowingly puce onions, along with their pink juices over the salad in the bowl, add the oil and olives, then using your hands toss the salad very gently so that the feta and melon don’t lose their shape.
7. Add a good grinding of black pepper and taste to see whether the dressing needs more lime.

 

Recipe by Nigella Lawson from Forever Summer With Nigella

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~ by eaesthete on 06/24/09.

8 Responses to “Endless Summer Salad”

  1. Got it all and looking for a summer salad for an early dinner tonight! Serendipity — thanks!

  2. Came out rather nice. refreshing. The parsley didn’t make it and I substituted a little torn Romaine. Turns out the mint plant is spearmint, which was unexpected. Mrs. E. thinks basil would do nicely, too. I might monkey around with some ginger to add snap. Wished it had looked as good as your photo though! I did “tweet” the link to your recipe.

    • Oh E,

      Thanks for the suggestions and I’m not surprised about the parsley.
      Seemed a bit off to me as well. But what of the lime? And yes to the basil.

      And congratulations on Tweeting. You too succumbed so it seems.

  3. I used Key Limes and the juice over the red onion is marvelous. I’ll use it in another recipe somewhere. Reminds me of Thai or Vietnamese.

    Yes, Twitter…. ah brand building. Holding out about Facebook. Possibly the last person on earth. And without a 3G phone with QWERTY keyboard… . I feel so 19th Cent.

  4. I’ve actually had this salad. As someone who typically turns into a 3 year old at the sight of fruit mixed with anything other than more fruit, this salad was surprisingly yummy and refreshing. I don’t know why the combination of flavors works (maybe the cucumber-ness of watermelon is awakened in this mix), but it does.

  5. Perfect! I am thinking that arugula (rocket as our beloved Brits like to call it) would be brilliant as an alternative to the parsley. It has a lovely peppery edge with tender bite.

    Cheers to Nigella!

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